The Evolving Meaning of Take Me (I’m Yours)

Installation view of the exhibition Take Me (I'm Yours). September 16, 2016 – February 5, 2017. The Jewish Museum, NY. Photo by: David Heald.

Installation view of the exhibition Take Me (I’m Yours). September 16, 2016 – February 5, 2017. The Jewish Museum, NY. Photo by: David Heald.

 

The Jewish Museum’s participatory exhibition Take Me (I’m Yours) is now halfway through its nearly five-month run and the artworks are being eagerly consumed by visitors. Featuring 42 international and intergenerational artists, every work was designed to be reproduced in the thousands, then taken away.

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Jewish Advertising on Television

Installation view of the exhibition The Television Project: You Don't Have To Be Jewish. September 16, 2016 – February 12, 2017. The Jewish Museum, NY. Photo by: David Heald.

Installation view of the exhibition The Television Project: You Don’t Have To Be Jewish. September 16, 2016 – February 12, 2017. The Jewish Museum, NY. Photo by: David Heald.

 

The Television Project, an exhibition series at the Jewish Museum, introduces Jewish Museum visitors to a dynamic part of its collection: the National Jewish Archive of Broadcasting, the largest and most comprehensive body of broadcast materials on 20th century Jewish culture in the United States with more than 4,000 holdings. The latest installment of the series, You Don’t Have to Be Jewishexplores advertising produced for Jewish audiences or with Jewish content, and examines the way religion, ethnicity, and identity play out on American television.

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Objects Tell Stories: Simchat Torah in the Jewish Museum Collection

Torah Scroll, Ioánnina, Greece, mid-late 19th century. The Jewish Museum, New York. Gift of Leon and Selma Cohen in memory of Morris and Mollie Cohen. © Photo The Jewish Museum, New York by Ardon Bar Hama

Torah Scroll, Ioánnina, Greece, mid-late 19th century. The Jewish Museum, New York. Gift of Leon and Selma Cohen in memory of Morris and Mollie Cohen. © Photo The Jewish Museum, New York by Ardon Bar Hama.

 

The Torah, as the Old Testament is called in Hebrew, is the core narrative of the Jewish faith. Every Sabbath, a portion of the Torah is chanted in the synagogue. It takes a year to complete the entire cycle through the five major portions of the Torah, also called the five books of Moses or the Pentateuch. Simchat Torah celebrates the completion and restarting of the cycle of reading the entire Torah. Continue reading